Site Information

 Loading... Please wait...

BLOG

SUMMER TRAVEL WITH FIDO

Posted by Under the Weather on

Planning a summer vacation? Maybe a road trip or plane ride to discover the rocky shoreline of Maine, or a cabin rental by a serene lake to enjoy the solitude, or a hiking vacation in Colorado? Whatever the destination, one of your first decisions should be whether you’ll be bringing your dog along or leaving him behind. Here are some guidelines to help answer that question.

Where to Go – Travel abroad is complicated. You’ll need to check out the policies of the nation you’re thinking of visiting first. Some countries require quarantines that may last six months or longer. Yet others only require that you show proof of vaccination. Other factors to consider are:

  • Is the temperature comfortable for your dog? You may need a few days of basking in the sun to unwind, but the heat may be too much for your pooch. Be sure you’re choosing a destination that’s fun and safe for your pet as well.
  • Is your destination known for infectious diseases? Some places are hot spots for Lyme disease or giardia, an intestinal parasite. If so, check with your vet to get armed with prevention strategies.
  • Are you up to date on vaccinations? Whether you’re planning to cross an international border or travel within the 48 contiguous states, you’ll want to carry your vaccination paperwork, at a minimum, or have your vet issue a health certificate that verifies your dog doesn’t have any contagious diseases.

Travelling by Plane – Airline travel with pets is increasing dramatically each year. Competitive carriers strive to make this choice more affordable and safer for their pet-loving customers. Some dogs are small enough to travel as a carry-on, but the rules vary from airline to airline. If your dog meets the size requirement for flying in the cabin, his carrier will need to fit under the seat ahead of you.

If Fido needs to travel in the cargo compartment, invest in a sturdy, airline-approved carrier with enough space for your dog to move around easily, stand up and lie down. Clearly mark it with your contact information and “Live Animal” stickers. Other keys to carrier travel:

  • Ventilation holes should cover at least 14 percent of the wall surface, with most at the top half of the box.
  • Fixed food and water bowls should be accessible without opening the carrier door.
  • A few weeks before the trip, get your dog used to the carrier by leaving it out with the door open so he can explore freely. Once he’s comfortable with the crate, close the door for 5-10 minutes. Don’t make a big production with treats when you open the door, or he may associate the crate with being punished.

Related: Tips to Reduce Fido’s Travel Anxieties

Travelling by Car – Think through your intended itinerary. Will there be times when you plan stop along the way and not be able to take your dog with you? Even in cool weather, a closed metal car exposed to the sun can turn into an oven in no time. Never, never leave your dog in a closed car. Even a short run into the store can turn fatal. Other factors to keep in mind when travelling by car:

  • Safety first! A free-roaming dog in the car is unsafe for everybody. Plan to have him travel in his crate or with a harness and leash that can be buckled into your car’s seatbelt system. Also, only roll the window down a crack for him to sniff. Letting your dog hang his head out can lead to a bug or something else hitting him in the eye.
  • Travel equipped with lots of water, food, treats, blankets and toys. If your dog gets a nervous stomach in the car, consider bringing a bland diet product that can be prepared with hot water from a gas station.
  • Train your dog early to enjoy car travel. Start when they are a puppy for short distances and gradually increase the trips.

Related:  Buckle Up, Bowser

Sedation or Not – Many pet owners wonder whether they should sedate their dogs on long trips in the car or on a plane. Most vets do not recommend sedatives because of their potential side effects which can lead to medical emergencies. If your dog is travelling as cargo, no one will know he is having a medical problem, and there’s no chance for stopping if one should be detected.

Instead of sedation, consider giving your dog a calming supplement which can help your dog deal with the anxiety of travel without the dangers of prescription sedatives. A calming supplement supports relaxation, balanced behavior and sleep during times of stress.

Where to Stay – Pet-friendly hotels and motels are on the rise, so travelling with your dog is very easy these days. Some may restrict sizes or breeds or charge a special damage deposit, but you have many choices. Make your reservations well in advance so you have time to sort out your best option. A few tips on hotel travel:

  • Place your dog’s blanket on the floor to define his space, keeping him off the furniture and minimizing the shedding on the carpeting.
  • Put the “Do Not Disturb” sign on your door whenever you leave, so the housekeeper doesn’t accidentally let your dog free or get startled.

Related:  Fido Friendly Vacations

Leaving Fido Home – If the decision is to leave your dog at home during your travel, there are several options for his care. You might leave him with a relative or friend, have a relative or friend come stay in your home, hire a pet sitter or board him at a kennel. If a kennel is your choice:

  • Visit a few top-rated kennels in your area. Check out the accommodations for kennel sizes, care and play schedules. Do the other dogs appear to be content and well cared for? Are the spaces clean? What is their protocol for a medical emergency?
  • Once you’ve chosen a kennel, make your reservation early and confirm it. When you drop your dog off, leave a piece of your clothing with him, or something that is familiar and comforting. Don’t stage an emotional farewell which can cause anxiety for your dog. Leave your contact information and your vet’s number in case of emergency.

This blog is brought to you by Under the Weather®, provider of award-winning bland diet products for dogs. These bland diet products offer a quick and convenient solution when dogs experience digestive issues such as vomiting or diarrhea. Ready to go in minutes – just add boiling water to rehydrate.

The company also manufactures nutritional supplements for dogs and cats, including a line of calming soft chews for dogs and cats.

A portion of every sale goes to the Ruffy Rescue Fund. The company funds the transportation and spaying/neutering costs associated with bringing dogs from overpopulated kill shelters in the USA to Vermont for adoption.

View Our Products

Visit Our Blog Library

FIGHTING FLEAS & TICKS​

Spring has sprung, and it’s time for fighting fleas and ticks again. Are you winning the battle to keep fleas and ticks off your pets and out of your home? Here are five vet-approved recommendations for winning this ongoing struggle.Use Fast-Acting, Long-Lasting Products. There are a lot of products available today – from homemade remedies, to holistic products, to prescription [...]

Read More »


ARE EGGS GOOD FOR DOGS?

Many households are gearing up for a traditional Easter egg hunt this weekend. If your dog beats the kiddos to finding the eggs and perhaps eating one or two, is it cause for alarm? Not at all, as long as you use a non-toxic food coloring.Related:  Easter Treats Your Dog Will LoveBut what about feeding eggs as part of [...]

Read More »


BLAND DIET OPTIONS FOR DOGS

Dogs have a remarkable ability to digest just about anything. But, even with the greatest care, dogs will occasionally eat something that doesn’t agree. Or they can find themselves with an intestinal bug or under emotional stress which brings on bouts of vomiting or diarrhea. Related: Why is My Dog Vomiting?For these infrequent occurrences, veterinarians generally recommend a “bland [...]

Read More »


CAT NOT EATING?

Cats are built to eat several small meals each day. If your cat starts missing those meals, it can cause physiological problems, so this is not a situation that can be ignored hoping it will return to normal.If you suspect this non-eating is due to a health issue, make an appointment with your veterinarian as soon as possible. [...]

Read More »


STOP DOG DIARRHEA IN ITS TRACKS

When your dog has diarrhea, the only thing on your mind is finding a way to make it stop. You feel bad for your dog, your dog feels like he is doing something wrong but cannot control himself and your surroundings are getting riddled with stains. Ugh!!Related: Why Does Your Dog Get Diarrhea?The first step is to assess [...]

Read More »


THE BOW-WOW BENEFITS OF BONE BROTH

Bone broth has been all the rage the past few years for human health, but is it also beneficial for our dogs? Absolutely! Bone broth has been shown to: support joint healthhelp detox the liversupport digestive health and soothe a compromised gutprovide nutrients for a sick doghelp boost the immune systemoffer relief from food and environmental allergiesbenefit an [...]

Read More »


SMART SHOPPING FOR DOG FOOD

Do you trust your dog food manufacturer? As a dog owner, we’d like to believe we are feeding our dogs the best food we can give them. And, sometimes the flashy commercials and ads can give us the impression that a certain brand has our dog’s best interest at heart. But often, those large companies with the deep pockets [...]

Read More »


DOG VOMITING - THE #1 REASON FOR EMERGENCY ROOM VISITS

When you think about a dog going to the emergency room, you might envision a dog that’s been hit by a car, bit by another dog or suffering from a broken bone. But the leading cause of dog visits to the ER is actually vomiting. Understanding possible causes, knowing what to look for and being prepared to act is [...]

Read More »


WHY DOES YOUR DOG GET DIARRHEA?

The messy truth about dog diarrhea is that it’s a pretty common occurrence among canines. Most all dog owners have walked into a room to immediately recognize “that smell.” Now what? Do we run to the veterinarian’s office?Like most humans, dogs can come down with a mild case of diarrhea for a variety of reasons that aren’t serious. Something [...]

Read More »